1. Barnaby Walters: #indiewebcamp 2013 in numbers: 2 days, 4 rooms 43 Creators, 3 Apprentices participating in-person > 13 people participating remotely, including 5 by video 16 brainstorming sessions 11 selfdogfooding demos 11 hack demos 38 active IRC participants (people who actually said stuff) 60 people in IRC at any given time 2718 total IRC messages 176 wiki edits 35090 net wiki insertions (new chars) Most counts either manually from the wiki or scraped from the IRC logs, which are surprisingly nicely marked up. I received over 20 mentions via both pingback and webmention — I’d love to hear how many others received. Likewise, if anyone has personal stats like LOC or commit counts, please leave them in the comments! Does anyone who was there IRL have any other stats e.g. amount of food/drink consumed? Total bandwidth/electricity usage would also be awesome to know.

    I’m thinking of actually writing the code I used to calculate those stats and run it for previous and future indiewebcamps, too — might be fun to see how we’re growing!

  2. 2013 in numbers:

    • 2 days, 4 rooms
    • 43 Creators, 3 Apprentices participating in-person
    • > 13 people participating remotely, including 5 by video
    • 16 brainstorming sessions
    • 11 selfdogfooding demos
    • 11 hack demos
    • 38 active IRC participants (people who actually said stuff)
    • ≈60 people in IRC at any given time
    • 2718 total IRC messages
    • 176 wiki edits
    • 35090 net wiki insertions (new chars)

    Most counts either manually from the wiki or scraped from the IRC logs, which are surprisingly nicely marked up.

    I received over 20 mentions via both pingback and webmention — I’d love to hear how many others received. Likewise, if anyone has personal stats like LOC or commit counts, please leave them in the comments!

    Does anyone who was there IRL have any other stats e.g. amount of food/drink consumed? Total bandwidth/electricity usage would also be awesome to know.

  3. In reply to a post on twitter.com

    @zakkain at the moment everything I post is a note or an article, both of which get POSSEd to twitter automatically by my server and then to Facebook manually if I want. Delegating to an external service, even if it’s one I manage, is probably a good long term solution, but I always want to get the syndicated URL back on my site which complicates things a little more.

    I know others are having success using IFTTT for POSSE.

  4. I’m beginning to think that I want to store two broad categories of content on my site, content which is defined by the time it occurred/is published and content which is primarily defined by some other attribute.

    Examples of content defined by time, which at the moment I’m using notes for:

    • short, tweet-like notes
    • (often) ideas
    • checkins
    • bits of personal data like , , sleep or other quantified self-type things
    • replies
    • photos
    • some longer written pieces
    • assorted other location data e.g. journeys, runs, walks

    Examples of content primarily defined by things other than time:

    • essay-like articles
    • experiments and tools
    • venues
    • profile data
    • contacts/people — although this is a tricky one which requires further experimentation
  5. Sandeep Shetty: # Liking Mutable Things On most silos where people can't edit stuff they've posted, you're liking immutable things. On the #indieweb, however, where content owners have complete control over __their__ content, you're liking things that are potentially mutable. One way to mitigate the problems of liking mutable things (like I do with #converspace) might be to quote the thing you liked along with your like post. #converspace #rssb #thinkingoutloud

    @sandeepshetty that’s the reason for reply contexts — dealing with content which changes or goes away. If you store the reply/like context then your copy of the data is always the most valuable, most complete. Otherwise it’s the copy shown on the remote site.