1. My take on generic prev/next controls on keyup, using only bean for events, based on previous work by Aaron Parecki and Tantek Çelik:

    
    // Generic prev/next navigation on arrow key press
    bean.on(document.body, 'keyup', function (e) {
      var prevEl, nextEl;
      
      if (document.activeElement !== document.body) return;
      if (e.metaKey || e.ctrlKey || e.altKey || e.shiftKey) return;
      
      if (e.keyCode === 37) {
        prevEl = document.querySelector('[rel~=previous]');
        if (prevEl) bean.fire(prevEl, 'click');
      } else if (e.keyCode === 39) {
        nextEl = document.querySelector('[rel~=next]');
        if (nextEl) bean.fire(nextEl, 'click');
      }
    }); 
    
  2. Hugo Roy: Barnaby Walters Alex i'm curious how you get suggestions from ddg.gg (just testing the comments and indieauth)

    @hugoroyd I don’t actually get suggestions from DDG, the suggestions are from Google, but my search goes through DDG. Thinking about it, this probably actually negates many privacy benefits and I should turn it off.

  3. Yesterday we at Vísar tested the neat SVG image element hack on all the devices and browsers we had at hand to see how it performed and whether or not it was viable to use in production.

    Given this markup:

    <svg>
        <image xlink:href="http://example.com/the-image.svg" src="http://example.com/the-image.png" width="100" height="100" />
    </svg>

    Here’s a table of what each browser+device downloaded:

    Browser Format Requested
    Mob. Safari iOS 4.2.1 PNG
    Mob. Safari iOS 6.1.3 SVG
    Chrome 28 Mac SVG
    Safari 5.1.9 Mac SVG
    Safari 6.0.5 Mac SVG
    Firefox 26 Mac SVG
    Firefox 22 Mac SVG
    IE 8.0.6 PNG
    IE 10 SVG+PNG
    Kindle (3rd gen) PNG

    Note that the Kindle downloaded the PNG despite having pretty good SVG support. Tests carried out locally by watching the Django request logs.

    At first, this looked perfect — browsers which supported SVG only downloaded the SVG (apart from IE 10), and other browsers just got the PNG. However, it seems that SVG image elements can’t be sized with percentages, meaning our flexible layouts were never going to work. I tried to fix it using the dreaded viewBox and user units (as I have previously to compensate for percentage-based units not being allowed in SVG paths), but that just led to everything being completely the wrong size.

    So, (unless someone can show me how to fix this), whilst we think this is a great hack, it’s not going to work out for our product due to the weirdness of SVG sizing limitations.

  4. Ben Werdmuller: Government - the last great gatekeeper - is ripe for disruption.

    The first is to publicly declare the jurisdiction in which you live, and in which your data is hosted. That way, people can make an informed decision about how to communicate with you.

    That’s a really brilliant idea. Maybe link the brand names to their tosdr.org pages too.

  5. Every now and again I wonder if the same sort of fandoms which Adventure Time, My Little Pony et al have now would have arisen around things like The Clangers and Captain Scarlet if web culture had been as evolved (or even existed) in the 60-70s as it is now.

    Would people cosplay as Jones the Steam, post videos analysing the character development in The Herbs, communicate using Noggin The Nog reaction faces and write erotic Portland Bill fanfics?

    A bearded viking-esque guy in a pointed hat with safety covers drinks some ale, then spits it out in surprise and look to the right.

    Actually, don’t answer that.


    Spit-takes are better with ale and viking helmets. Wait, no. Everything is better with ale and viking helmets.