1. So @indiewebcampuk is over-capacity! Really looking forward to meeting you all in Brighton. If you’re interested in coming please do add yourself to the wait list in case there are cancellations, it would be a pity to have empty seats and there are plenty of other great events going on at the same time. indiewebcamp.com/2013/UK

  2. @cuv82 really sorry but I had to move you to the waiting list for IndieWebCampUK — we’re at capacity, currently looking into the possibility of having extra people come along. I’ll let you know if that happens or if someone cancels. Hope to see you in Brighton!

  3. Aral Balkan: @BarnabyWalters It’s up :) Looking forward to hearing your thoughts :) http://t.co/i3aivZq6L6

    Aral Balkan there’s some excellent+useful constructive criticism in there! I think you’re still misunderstanding the problem being solved and why indieauth evolved to work the way it does, as the solutions you suggest are in fact a big part of the problem. We wrote up a collaborative point-by-point response to your article here: indiewebcamp.com/On_Evolving_IndieAuth_Followup, which hopefully explains things better than I did previously.

  4. Working on iOS diagnostics dataviz tool for 30mins and I’ve contributed to an open source project. I have a good feeling about this.

  5. And the lesson of the day is: bean.fire(el, 'click') doesn’t work in Firefox Nightly, but turns out it’s unnecessary, because HTMLElement.click() does exactly the same thing and already works cross-browser. Always use the browser-native APIs if you can.

  6. Scott Jenson: @BarnabyWalters FYI, this is how your tweet looks. I realize *why* of course but this feels only 50% POSSE http://t.co/dBGiKU0Rqi

    @scottjenson also, without wanting to sound rude, you lecturing me about the quality of my POSSEd notes would be a lot more convincing if you were POSSEing notes (and thus running into these challenges) yourself :)

  7. Scott Jenson: @BarnabyWalters FYI, this is how your tweet looks. I realize *why* of course but this feels only 50% POSSE http://t.co/dBGiKU0Rqi

    @scottjenson referring to the truncation? I know what you mean, I made the conscious decision to ignore the length of truncated copies of my content as I didn’t want what felt like an unnecessary limitation of Twitter limiting my self-expression.

    Others (Tantek Çelik in particular) care more about the quality of their POSSEd notes, and build UIs which inform them when their notes go over tweet- or retweet-safe lengths. This is one of the places diversity of implementations helps us experiment without having to argue about stuff :)

    One interesting alternative is to spread the content of notes which are too long for a tweet over several tweets, but that leads to all sorts of weird directionality changes, potential for them to be interrupted, extra permalinks, etc.

  8. Conversation in the kitchen with one of my housemates — she noted that I baked a lot and asserted that I was “housy… like a housewife” because of it. Yay archaic gender stereotypes :/

    A productive evening’s baking was had nonetheless — three bagels, ~20 kanilsnuðar and one oddly shaped pizza.

  9. Reminder: If it’s not hypertext, doesn’t have a URL, has no hyperlinks, isn’t navigable in a web browser: it’s not the web.

  10. Spent the morning caving with Snorri — the world under the lava fields is even crazier than the surface!

    The texture of the caves (or more accurately lava/magma tubes) is extremely different to the water-formed caves back in the UK. There is a crazy mixture of jagged edges and smooth edges, caused by the magma cooling at different rates.

    The layered structure of the systems is as obvious in macro as it is close up — the smallest rocks have clearly defined layers, as do the caves themselves. Often it looks like the roof is in mid-collapse as one layer peels off another; on a rock shelf pieces of smooth ceiling rock lie centimetres from their original position.

    Although it looks scary to have pieces of ceiling lying around, in reality this is all pretty much frozen in place, as most of the collapsing will have taken place within a year after the cave’s formation, thousands of years ago.

    The colours are as striking and numerous as the shapes. It’s a pity they’re all locked up where light seldom reaches — caves are colour prisons.