1. If you’re working with undocumented lat/long coordinate data and, when plotted, everything’s coming out sort of in the right place but a little way off, check to see whether or not what looks like decimal lat long data is actually traditional DMS data.

    For example, I recently had to parse and plot a bunch of coordinates which looked like this: 6359550-2154605. I initially thought it was decimal lat/long data missing decimal points for some reason, so I plotted it as 63.59550, -21.54605. All of the coordinates were in the right place relative to each other, but about 1/3rd of a degree off. Turns out the data actually needed to be plotted as 63˚ 59' 55.0", -21˚ 54' 60.5".

    Here’s the python I wrote to clumsily convert the strange original form into decimal:

    def dms_to_decimal(old):
        if old[0] == '-':
            old = old[1:]
            multiplier = -1
        else:
            multiplier = 1
    
        return (int(old[0:2])+int(old[2:4])/60.0+int(old[4:6])/3600.0) * multiplier
  2. The problem with all mapping software ever:

    “Hm, that placename is a bit small to read” (zooms in) “TEXT, WHY U GET SMALLER AGAIN”