1. Scott Jenson: Barnaby Walters FYI, this is how your tweet looks. I realize *why* of course but this feels only 50% POSSE pic.twitter.com/dBGiKU0Rqi

    @scottjenson referring to the truncation? I know what you mean, I made the conscious decision to ignore the length of truncated copies of my content as I didn’t want what felt like an unnecessary limitation of Twitter limiting my self-expression.

    Others (Tantek Çelik in particular) care more about the quality of their POSSEd notes, and build UIs which inform them when their notes go over tweet- or retweet-safe lengths. This is one of the places diversity of implementations helps us experiment without having to argue about stuff :)

    One interesting alternative is to spread the content of notes which are too long for a tweet over several tweets, but that leads to all sorts of weird directionality changes, potential for them to be interrupted, extra permalinks, etc.

  2. In reply to a post on twitter.com

    @zakkain at the moment everything I post is a note or an article, both of which get POSSEd to twitter automatically by my server and then to Facebook manually if I want. Delegating to an external service, even if it’s one I manage, is probably a good long term solution, but I always want to get the syndicated URL back on my site which complicates things a little more.

    I know others are having success using IFTTT for POSSE.

  3. So, which is more annoying, POSSE permalinks w/ … if continued, in () if not, or Aral Balkan’s …tweet…continued…thing…? For comparison:

    Personally I find the …/() permalink/shortlink/short id pattern to be much more readable, especially when there are multiple long tweets happening at the same time, and they are mainly one or two words over Twitter’s limit. But it is more cluttered than the … technique.