1. Indiereader

    goal: by 2014-01-01, no longer be using twitter.com to read+reply to my friends’ content.

    It’s already possible to use web action toolbelt to add indieweb reply/bookmark buttons to twitter.com and weave to expand POSSEd copies into full posts, but I think that’s as far as the “progressively enhance the twitter UI for indieweb support” train goes. Remaining pain points:

    • Ads and other UI noise
    • Lack of good search
    • Lack of control over timeline — lists, following and blocking are the only ways to control what you see
    • Very weird in-timeline threaded conversation view

    Pieces in place allowing a seamless transition from using twitter.com:

    • A whole bunch of indiewebcampers publishing their notes+articles on their own sites using microformats2
    • An open source microformats2 parser
    • App.net mark up notes with microformats2 h-entry and h-card
    • h-card and xfn for follow lists, e.g. my contact list
    • Shim to parse twitter.com into microformats2 data
    • twitter-activitystreams to consume personal twitter feed as microformats2

    Pain points still to be resolved:

    • How to fall back to subscribing to someone’s twitter feed if they don’t publish their notes on their own site?
    • Whether or not to support ATOM+RSS — sure there’s a lot of it around, but it’s a nightmare, and I don’t want to encourage publishing invisible DRY-violating data. Perhaps superfeedr’s normalisation will be of use
    • What to do about all the wordpress blogs around with half-baked microformats support — auto-detect and use their ATOM feed? Try to find a related twitter account?
  2. Charles Stanhope: Barnaby Walters Is Facebook's behavior different from Twitter's t.co in this regard? (I don't use Facebook, so genuinely curious.)

    @cstanhope Twitter do indeed shorten all links, they’re just a little bit more honest about it. But I’m certainly going to make the extension unshorten them all too (there’s enough info in the HTML do to that without extra HTTP requests).

  3. Turns out the 2 JSON structures enable safe entity expansion just like twitter entities.

    In my reply contexts I am not wanting to embed 3rd party HTML in my site, so I take the p-summary and strip tags. But, I want embedded h-cards to be expanded just like at-mentions on twitter. Pseudocode:

    
    let h-card = canonical JSON structure for a note, with .summary as a plaintext representation of the content;
    
    for item in h-card.children:
     if not in_array('h-card', item.type) continue;
     let html = HTML representation of the child from properties.url, name, etc;
     replace item.value in h-card.summary with html
    

    Example here.

  4. Twitter’s “you only see replies from people you follow if you also follow the target of the reply” model is quite fascinating because it means that, within a particular community, the number of tweets you see is not directly proportional to the number of people you follow. It’s probably square or cubic, perhaps I’ll model it and see.

  5. I am hugely annoyed at @twitter’s API stupidity, but almost as annoyed by their failure to provide a consistent tweet authoring experience across their platform.

    If I see “remaining chars = 0”, I expect the tweet to post, not give me some near-meaningless error message. I also expect URLs to be automatically detected and compensated for consistently across the platform. This is just crap .