1. Aitor García Rey: @BarnabyWalters Do they have rennet at Burið!?! I didn’t know! A few desserts for next @SumendiRest have become suddenly possible… thanks!

    @_aitor welcome back! Yep, I spent several hours today on a wild goose chase which led me to Burið and now have a small vat of Skyr curing. Looking forward to tasting the Sumendi desserts, and I actually have one I’d like you to sample: an evolution of your hot chocolate recipe with some Icelandic influences…

  2. type=image/gif: @BarnabyWalters hello sir. Your name came up multiple times at #indiewebcamp in a positive light, so thought I'd say hi!

    @_jden hello! Been away for three weeks, good to see indiewebcamp went well (as always), I was sorry to have missed it but hope to come to IWC UK.

  3. @kartik_prabhu amazing work overall! This is one of my favourite parts though — the fact that fragmention comments fall back gracefully if they’re not supported on either side, and yet all the data required to present them is preserved, so future updates can retro-actively put old marginalia in the right place!

    I wonder how tricky it would be to implement this on the comment publisher side too — detecting fragmention URLs and tailoring the reply context content…

  4. Amber Case: 8 hours of hand beading later... Actually that was quite relaxing! Doing something in the real world is a very nice counter to software.

    @caseorganic beautiful! Yup, it’s very healthy and grounding to make physical things after computering a lot.

  5. Aaron Parecki: @BarnabyWalters Also worst case you can just print it out again at the terminal.

    @aaronpk whaaaaa

    You realise that in my mind this attitude basically makes you some sort of fearless adventurer wizard hero, who, ARMED with his MAGIC LIGHTS, fears not the CHECK-IN DESK and FLYING METAL BOXES and requires no A4 SHIELD to ward off the spectres of GETTING LOST IN SOME OTHER COUNTRY

  6. Aaron Parecki: @BarnabyWalters You still print your boarding pass on paper? ;-) I stick to magic lights all the way through.

    @aaronpk oh wow, I would be terrified that the magic lights would break or not work or run out of power or get lost or crash. I trust paper waaaay more than magic lights and can’t travel without my wad of A4 pieces of paper :)

  7. Erin Jo Richey: This is relevant to my interests. "Share: the icon no one agrees on." https://bold.pixelapse.com/minming/share-the-icon-no-one-agrees-on

    @erinjo perhaps the difficulty in creating an effective icon stems from the fact that the physical metaphors associated with “share” do not map well to the online behaviour associated with the term, allowing the word to be used successfully but making giving it an image a challenge.

    My theory: the most basic usage of “share” generally refers to organising mutual access to some resource between pre-determined, consenting participants (he shared his food with him, she shared her connection with her coworkers, the schools shared a playing field). This holds for more abstract non-physical use of “share”, as in “she shared her story”, ”they shared a secret”.

    In some cases (e.g. private messaging [where the verb “message” or “send” would more often be used] or posting to a group) the “known participants” facet holds up, but not so much the pre-determination and/or mutual consent/awareness present in the physical examples — unless for example the context is an online group set up explicitly for the sharing of links to resources about a topic.

    In the common case of “sharing” as it’s characterised online (posting a short text post containing a link and optionally some comment, typically with a link preview, broadcast to a wide audience on a whim with no mutual pre-determination), not much of the original metaphor holds up, and I’d argue that “post” is a more suitable term (“publish” less so as its use connotes posting of a thought-out original work).

    None of this is backed up by actual data though — I’d be interested to hear your thoughts on it.

  8. Bret Victor: How can you call the web a publishing medium when your bookshelf can just vanish? URLs and HTTP are a disaster. Doesn't have to be this way.

    @worrydream “bookshelf” is completely the wrong mental model. A “list of links” is like a list of postal addresses of places (hence web “address”) as a physical analogy, or the contents of their authors brains as a human analogy. Complaining about their contents changing/disappearing is as complaining that space/time/humans are “a disaster” (which admittedly may broadly be true).

    “your bookshelf” is whatever personal archives you make of your favourite things (analogies: photos, notes, physical books), and therefore the solution is better personal archival tools. I’ve made a start — my website automatically takes an archive of every page I link to and stores it as HTML+HTTP headers in the filesystem, which has proven to be a quite robust format.

    Of course if you actually have a practical idea about how to improve on the infrastructure of the web, speak up and/or build it :)

    Edit: reflecting on this, “completely the wrong mental model” is incorrect, and better expressed as “a mental model which is inconsistent with reality”. There are no “wrong” mental models, only a variety of co-existing metaphors with varying levels and areas of consistency with reality.

  9. Ben Werdmüller: 21st century politician to watch: @stellacreasy (whose icon is her dressed as Boba Fett), v actively engaging on social media. The future.

    .@benwerd talked to any politicians about Known? I realised recently that politics is, broadly speaking, the battle for ideas, fought with language on the field of mass media. I’d much rather the field was platforms which belonged to citizens, rather than states or corporations. Social media is a start, but principals can go much further.